“If anything, people may be letting trains go past because they have to stay online for a couple more minutes to get something done,” said Anthony Townsend, a researcher in New York for the Institute for the Future, a Silicon Valley think tank. “I think we’ll see some odd and unusual behaviors like that.”

Or worst, as I’ve seen before, someone actually held the door open of the train while they were inside to finish their conversation. Awful.

There was this one time when a woman was able to get reception on her mobile in a train stopped at a station.  To finish her cell-phone conversation, she literally held the car door open to finish her last thoughts. This will happen more frequently as wifi become accessible inside the subway station.

Other complaints in addition to Ron’s list:

  • People who litter in the car (likely after they eat a full meal)
  • People who hog the poles by leaning their entire body on it
  • People who don’t stand up for pregnant women or the elderly
  • People who don’t appreciate personal space as they lean over to read the map

The New York Times invited notable New Yorkers to personalize the iconic subway map. Here are a few examples from calligrapher Bernard Maisner, graphic designer Milton Glaser and graffiti artist Lady Pink (or Sandra Fabara). More on Your Commute, Your Life, Your Personal Subway Map.

You can also create your own map by either downloading a Photoshop template (you’ll need to be pretty familiar with using Photoshop) or print a base map with some customization.

After you’re done creating your subway story , you can then submit it for potential inclusion to a gallery.

Create away!

Next Stop (by DrewVigal)
Getting on the F train in Brooklyn most mornings, I often wish there was a way to reveal (via some augmented reality technology) which stop a seated passenger will get off on so I can stand near them. This will ultimate increase my chances of getting a seat for my 45-minute-ish ride to midtown.
Obviously, standing isn’t a huge deal, but it makes reading on an iPad a bit easier.
Now if everyone had that technology, the knowledge wouldn’t be unique and thus ultimately render that advantage useless. Maybe the same technology can be used to help the non-observant recognize an elderly or a pregnant woman standing on the train.
OK. Maybe I’ve spent too much time already thinking about it. Said it. Done.

Next Stop (by DrewVigal)

Getting on the F train in Brooklyn most mornings, I often wish there was a way to reveal (via some augmented reality technology) which stop a seated passenger will get off on so I can stand near them. This will ultimate increase my chances of getting a seat for my 45-minute-ish ride to midtown.

Obviously, standing isn’t a huge deal, but it makes reading on an iPad a bit easier.

Now if everyone had that technology, the knowledge wouldn’t be unique and thus ultimately render that advantage useless. Maybe the same technology can be used to help the non-observant recognize an elderly or a pregnant woman standing on the train.

OK. Maybe I’ve spent too much time already thinking about it. Said it. Done.